Projects  >   2006   >   Lines of Food: Men and Fishing

Lines of Food: Men and Fishing

Year: 2006

Authorship: Adam Huggins / FABRICA

Lines of food: Men and Fishing
Adam Huggins follows fishermen from three continents (Asia, America and Africa) during their work and daily life to record the various traditional fishing techniques and their relationship with the local way of life.

 

90 million tons of fish are captured annually, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
Fisheries are global businesses that provide income and sustenance to millions of people. For a large part, the fishing culture in each community is more than a mere source of income, it becomes the core element to the community’s identification process.

These images capture stories from the life and work of fishermen in three distinct communities in Alaska, USA, Unzen City, Japan and Kalemie, Democratic Republic of Congo. These communities, with differing fishing traditions, settled in different parts of the world, are subtly the same as fishing is the main element of daily life for each one.

Alaska’s main products come from fisheries. However, this does not necessarily translate to economic abundance for the two fishermen from Port Townsend. Their ideals of following traditional fishing methods – focusing on sustainability and quality over  quantity - has led to facing daily economic difficulties, additionally caused by the impossibility of competing with industrial productions.

Fishing is a highly respected activity in Japan. In Unzen City, fishing secrets and techniques are proudly handed down from father to son, and are melded perfectly with the traditional Japanese lifestyle and philosophy. Being part of the slow fishing process is a real dream for those who do not descend from a fishermen’s family. Those few will be sure to work with grand efforts.

Fishery in Kalemie, Democratic Republic of Congo, is done at Lake Tanganyika inside of old and barely floating boats. Here, the growth of fish supersedes the small amount fishermen are able to capture, due to a lack of proper material resources and outdated techniques. In a country ravaged by violence and conflict, where starvation is behind every corner, fishing represents for this community a safe possibility to survive.

This visual exploration highlights the contrast and similarities of these communities. These three regions are highly influenced by their traditional fishing natures; this is reflected in both individual and communal levels and is affected by the cultural context of each region, thus representing global diversity through a common activity.

 

Featured in the I SEE project exhibited in 'Les Yeux Ouverts' at Centre Pompidou (France 2006), Milan Triennale (Italy 2007), Shanghai Art Museum (China 2007), Tokyo ShiodomeItalia Creative Center (Japan 2008)

 

I SEE

A physical and visual journey of exploration into the current trends of historical, cultural, artistic, social and economic development. “I see” also means “I observe” and “I understand”. Six photographers from Fabrica each chose a story to represent one of the world’s six main geographic areas: North America, South America, East, Far East, Africa and Europe.

 

Commissioned by:
Fabrica for the I SEE project

 

In partnership with:
Terra Madre: a Slow Food forum which brings together representatives of communities across the five continents in order to develop a new idea of sustainable agriculture. Adam Huggins follows fishermen from three continents (Asia, America and Africa) during their work and daily life to record the various traditional fishing techniques and their relationship with the local way of life.

 

 


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